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COVID-19 Updates
Most fall courses are online or using video conferencing. Students scheduled for hybrid coursework on campus must complete a daily health assessment. Read More

Insights: The 90 Minute Lecture Series

The Victory Garden
Join Carol Cohen as she takes us on an historic journey of the modern-day victory garden. Throughout this informative lecture you will be introduced to valuable primary sources and interesting stories about the important role the victory garden has played in the past and present as well its part in addressing the sustainability of the planet for the future.

Online | 17219 | $8
Friday | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
9/18/20 – 9/18/20
Note: Fixed video conference course. Internet and webcam required.
Instructor: Carol Cohen

The Victory Garden Registration form (PDF)

Secure Form Submission

Community Engagement & Service
This informal seminar will describe the goals and benefits of service learning and community engagement for students and citizens and discuss the different types of opportunities available. Presenter and Professor of Sociology, Lucy Anne Hurston, will highlight her work with students and Habitat for Humanity, including several trips to New Orleans following hurricane Katrina, travels to a Heifer Farm in Rutland, MA, and even existing in a Cardboard City on campus each year.

Online | 17216 | $8
Friday | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
10/2/20 – 10/2/20
Note: Fixed video conference course. Internet and webcam required.
Instructor: Lucy Anne Hurston

Community Engagement & Service Registration form (PDF)

Secure Form Submission

History of Blackstone River Valley
At first glance, the Blackstone River seems remarkably ordinary. But when one looks closer, the incredible history of the place comes into view. It was along the banks of the Blackstone River that the American Industrial Revolution began at Slater Mill. This revolution spread across the Valley, and completely changed the United States of America. Home to over 10,000 historic sites, the Blackstone Valley remains an important home to this nation’s industrial heritage. Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park was established to protect, preserve, and interpret this remarkable history for this and future generations. What makes the Blackstone Valley so important? What stories does this place tell? How do these stories affect our past, present, and future? Join us to find out!

Online | 17220 | $8
Friday | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
11/6/20 – 11/6/20
Note: Fixed video conference course. Internet and webcam required.
Instructor: Mark Mello

History of Blackstone River Valley Registration form (PDF)

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Beekeeping 101
Bees are a crucial piece of our food chain, and now more than ever folks are interested in being involved in what they eat. Learn about the basics of beekeeping–everything from why bees make so much extra honey to why they’re considered so at risk.

Online | 17218 | $8
Friday | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
11/20/20 – 11/20/20
Note: Fixed video conference course. Internet and webcam required.
Instructor: Andrew Cerrone

Beekeeping 101 Registration form (PDF)

Secure Form Submission

Declaration of Human Rights
Celebrate the 72nd Anniversary of the passage of the Declaration of Human Rights together during this informative lecture and discussion about Eleanor Roosevelt’s important role in creating the Declaration of Human Rights during the early days of the United Nations. Take a close look at this document which still holds the important meaning and purpose it did 72 years ago.

Online | 17221 | $8
Friday | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
12/4/20 – 12/4/20
Note: Fixed video conference course. Internet and webcam required.
Instructor: Carol Cohen

Declaration of Human Rights Registration form (PDF)

Secure Form Submission

Gravestone/Burial Rites Plymouth Co.
Have you ever wandered through an old cemetery and wondered about the symbols on gravestones? In this lecture we will explore the meanings of these gravestone symbols, and discuss how changes in iconography and burial rites were the result of cultural changes throughout the colony. We will be focusing on these deathway trends from 1620- 1700 and using Plymouth Colony’s Burial Hill as a case study.

Online | 17222 | $8
Friday | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
12/18/20 – 12/18/20
Note: Fixed video conference course. Internet and webcam required.
Instructor: Ashley de Pasquale

Gravestone/Burial Rites Plymouth Co. Registration form (PDF)

Secure Form Submission

About Our Instructors

Andrew Cerrone holds a B.S. in Secondary Education from Lesley University, an M.A. in English Literature, an M.S. in Accounting, and an M.B.A. in Accounting from the University of Massachusetts. Andrew is a beekeeper from Duxbury, Massachusetts. He is also a member of the Plymouth County Beekeepers’ Association and has been keeping bees for a number of years on an experimental sustainable farmstead. Andrew has taught at UMass Boston and Fisher College in the past, as well as within Attleboro High School’s vocational training department.

Carol Cohen earned a B.A. in Anthropology and an M.S. in Urban Planning from Boston University. She holds three Massachusetts Teacher Certifications. She has been teaching in higher education since 1981. Carol presently teaches at Lesley University in the Graduate School of Education.

Ashley de Pasquale holds B.A. degrees from Lesley University in English, Ancient Art History, and Education and an M.A. in History Education from the University of Massachusetts.

Lucy Anne Hurston holds an A.S. from Manchester Community College, a B.A. from Central Connecticut State University, and an M.A. from Ohio State University. She is a Professor and Department Chair of Sociology and Sign Language at Manchester Community College. She has taught Sociology for the past 23 years. Professor Hurston is the author of the acclaimed biography, “Speak, So You Can Speak Again: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston”.

Mark Mello holds a B.A. in History from Bridgewater State University and an M.A. in US History from Providence College. Mark is a life-long historian, with a special love of the American Civil War. He currently works for the National Park Service at Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park as a Park Ranger and a Public Historian. He has taught classes at the Second Half Life-Long Learning Center in Fall River, and several other Life-Long Learning programs. He is a Civil War Reenactor and has lectured on topics related to the American Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Antebellum Period to numerous groups including Civil War Round Tables, historical associations, public libraries, and schools.